Mental Health in the Pandemic

By: TAYLOR LAMBERT

Mental health is a fickle thing… almost everyone, at one point or another, will struggle with some form of mental illness. With least 1 in 5 adults in America struggling with mental health, it’s safe to say that it’s a common problem in America today. Since the pandemic started back in March 2020, we’ve seen a historical spike in mental illness, with 40% of Americans struggling with mental illness or substance abuse. The numbers that plague our generation are even more astonishing, with 75% of young adults struggling with drug-related problems and mental illness. Due to the way America’s suicide monitoring system works, experts won’t know until about 2 years from now if rates have risen since the pandemic.

I can say firsthand that mental illness is not a battle that you have to fight alone. With depression, anxiety, and suicide rates rising in the past months due to the pandemic, psychological help has been more important than ever. Taking that step to reach out can be scary, and it may be hard to find reasons to do so. You might convince yourself that you’re ok, that it’s not that bad, or that you like to handle your problems within yourself, but in a time when we are all struggling together, getting help could very possibly be a lifesaver. Rather than suffer in silence like so many people do, be the change that you so desperately need, and talk to a parent, friend, guardian, or someone else that you trust. You do not have to fight your battle alone, with so many resources available help is only a text, call, email, or conversation away. 

Suicide hotlines and text lines are openly available if you don’t wish to talk to a friend or family member, having a source of help where you get to stay anonymous and talk about your feelings can help substantially. 

If you or someone you know is struggling, please do not be afraid to utilize these resources:

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline – 1-800-273-8255 

Crisis Hotline – Text HOME to 741741

Call 911 in the event of a mental health emergency. 

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